FORGE BLOG

Navigating a New Job

January 5, 2022

We all go through changes in our lives, whether it's relocating to a new place, joining a new organization, meeting a new client, or changing jobs, projects, or teams. Transitions and change are "certain" in life and fall under the category of "predictable surprise."

Knowing that transition is key to a successful career rather than just leaping in and hoping for the best. To navigate a new job and enjoy the "honeymoon phase," we must adapt slowly and carefully.

If you are the new employee, take your time and plan ahead of time. This can mean the difference between a successful move and pondering if you were the right choice after all. The focus is now on you, and your honeymoon achievements and failures will shape your reputation for years to come. Here are few steps to navigate your new job.

  • Permit yourself to be the new kid in town.

Leaders all around the world complain about being the "newbie" who doesn't know how to do things. Refilling the coffee machine in a new office or being promoted into a new leadership role are examples of this.

Recognize that it takes time to adjust to a new role and that there is a lot to learn. Accept this and allow yourself to learn, ask questions, and rely on others. You'll learn a lot faster (and more efficiently) this way, plus you will meet new colleagues.

  • To begin, act as if you're going to go.

You're starting over. You want to impress your new coworkers so that when you leave, they'll regret it rather than look forward to it.

Consider your previous role's legacy and the legacy you intend to build in this current role. Consider the adjectives you want others to use to characterize working with you and what you can do to bridge any gaps. Make sure those adjectives are positive and something that you can be proud of!

  • Be inquisitive and educate yourself about your new organization.

 Learn about your new organization, before you can prioritize and make changes, you must first comprehend the historical context. Question (a lot) and Endeavour to understand why things turn out the way they do before making adjustments.

Understanding the history and context of your new organization's work processes will help you articulate why change is required. Without it, your adjustments may be compared to telling your new staff, "Your baby is awful." Remember that your new coworkers worked hard to create the scenario you inherit. Before you toss that legacy, honor it!

Transitions are a time of insecurity and change, as well as a period of acclimating to the new rules of interaction. You may either wing it or trust that your intelligence, which helped you obtain the post in the first place, will assist you in navigating your new job smoothly.

  • Develop and maintain relationships.

Don't limit your professional networking to the "regular suspects." Our "vertical" stakeholders: our boss and direct reports are naturally cared for. But it's also our horizontal interactions that make or break our success.

“Invest on relationships first, then structure and processes. “Know who is where, doing what, and why,” Topgolf's Jose Acevedo. “Everything else just comes into place. Let your partners know you are personally invested in their success.

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